How can you become an Expert UX Designer?

If you want to be a UX designer that everyone looks up to, then be prepared for a whole load of work. A UX designer’s job is not limited to just making the product, he is responsible for the entire user experience. This requires him to research based on consumer’s habits and tastes, market in an appropriate manner, deliver the good through efficient and reliable means, and finally improve based on feedback.

An expert UX designer’s ghostly presence will be felt throughout the process because he has to be involved. Ultimately, he is the one responsible.

Following are the ways that separate an expert UX designer from a mediocre one.

Research-The Appetizer

If there is anything an expert UX designer must have learned over his years of experience is that one should never jump-start with the project. The problem is that beginners are driven by the notion to start immediately, either to quickly finish off the work or to not waste time. But research can never be relegated to “wasting time”. It is imperative.

A designer cannot operate through his single mind for he is developing the product for someone else. Collecting information, analysis of past experience, and observation of trends will give him an insight that will allow him to build a user experience that reflects his customer’s preferences.

Communication

The idea has settled in your brain and you have drafted an entire plan for its execution. When the time comes, to communicate it with your clients you need to come down to their level for a proper explanation. Use a language they understand. Throw away jargons and complicated diagrams of the technical world. A complex idea can be simplified by breaking it down into different parts and using presentations and examples from the contemporary world.  Remember, if your message is not clear they might not consider your idea. Therefore, the actual implementation depends on your communication skills.

A Nosy-Business

Get rid of the attitude that dictates “let it be” cause you as an UX designer cannot afford that. Everything becomes your business because a user experience is result a myriad of functions. And it becomes your job to link them in a cohesive manner and be vigilant of disruptions, coordination problems, technical barriers, and timings issues.

Your job’s completion depends heavily on how every other department works. Hence you have to imitate the nosy friend who loves to interfere into other people’s business as if your job depends on it. Cause it does.

We Love Diversity!

As you may have already observed the different duties this job encompasses, it is extremely important for a UX designer to be diverse. Diversity means he should not be limited one function for example web designing but should also be well-informed in other areas such as technical writing, graphical background designing. Since a lot of supervising comes with being a UX designer, having an upper hand in such varied skill sets further underscores their credibility for their job.

Hydra

This field requires you to think like no one else does. Otherwise, they would have hired someone else and not you. Owing to technical innovation, our time has enthusiastically welcomed new ideas. However, it has also made consumers even more demanding. They want something that is well worth their money and if it is not, can lead to a disastrous consequence for the business. An unhappy customer will spread the bad word of mouth.

This puts UX designers under pressure because if you are all set to please maximum number of customers at low cost, it certainly means behaving like a hydra with several heads. You need to think not like yourself but the people who will be engaging in that experience. Think of one thing that connects them all and make your work the frontrunner in this competitive environment.

Proactivity & Firm

An outstanding UX designer is one who delivers. He takes the extra step to spot what the users look for in an experience and makes that as the basis of his project. He is proactive! He keeps an eye out for what other UX designers are not providing.

Moreover, he does not easily give in. Since UX designer overviews the progress of other departments, he is aware of all the barriers that might impede the execution of the project. A bad UX designer will accept defeat but when an expert deals with this problem, he will not rest until the situation is completely dissected and resolved. Because he knew what the job entailed when he signed up for it.

Too many tests

Before launching the product, you should develop a prototype that could be tested. Most businesses go through this process to ensure usability and make changes in the product in the initial stages based on the response. This saves a lot of time and money.

It is easy to get a hold of a few volunteers or form a focus who would be willing to give you their comments. However, make sure that the ones you are approaching are in fact your target audience.

Feedback Functionality

Emphasis is on the word “USER”. It doesn’t matter if your experience was nerve-racking and you wouldn’t want to repeat the process. It was never about you, it was about your customer. An expert designer would value customer feedback and improve the product. He would tweak the areas that score low on customer satisfaction which may not necessarily be related to the product, they could be supplementary services as well such as marketing or delivery.

Whatever your customer has to say is a rich source of improvement for your work. It is surpasses any report, graph, or number. It is gold. So make good use of whatever they have to say.

These qualities sum up a UX designer who is a great employee, cooperative co-worker and as customers whose products we would definitely want to grab. It is a lot of work but it pays off when you climb to the level of an expert.

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Written by Syed Ali

I'm a self taught web designer, experienced freelancer and an addicted blogger. Always remains ardent to get acquainted with new technology at the first opportunity.

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